Chicago Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Drop shotting is a technique I know to be deadly, though it is one I am still waiting to master. I have used drop shots in wisconsin a handful of times, with few fish, and little confidence. I know how deadly a tactic it can be and want to get into it more so I can add it to my arsenal of tactics this season. I have usually had more confidence and experience in texas rigs, senko wacky worm fishin, or bass jiggin when it comes to slower presentations and soft plasitcs. I want to grow confidence in this sweet tactic.

What tips do you guys got, please only respond is you have caught numerous fish on this rig, and consider it to be a confidence rig for you as an angler. (lets hear from the drop shot Masters)

1. What factors like weather, depth, type of structure or cover, fish activeness, time of year, and so on change your dropshot rig and how?

2. What are your confidence baits to be rigged on a dropshot. (I dont wanna hear what you read works well, I have read and watched enough on this topic already. I wanna hear what you personally have caught alot on in dropshotting)

3. How do you adjust your tactic from the clues the fish give you?

4. What is the prefered length of the line to the weight, and in what conditions do you change it and how?

5. Tips on weight size vs depth, color vs conditions and water, line type and ect...

6. Almost the most important question. What clue do you get when you know it time to dropshot? When all else fails? or when the weather is cold, or when your fishing a key small piece of structure, what is the ideal situation to chuck a dropshot out there? I Know dropshots can catch fish all the time all year round, but when will the dropshot outproduce any other tactic?

Chime in if you have good knowledge to share, all input is valued. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
953 Posts
I use the drop shot rig a lot. In fact, it probably came close to outfishing the senko last year for me. I use it mainly in a little deeper water by dropoffs. Often along a weed edge. I typically use either an 1/8 or 1/4 oz weight. The only thing I use to drop shot are the Chompers drop shot worms. I might expand in the future, but right now that's what it is. Any color seems to work. The main thing about the drop shot is that you should be twitching the slack line mostly with a little bit of movement forward. You shouldn't be just dragging the weight across the bottom. If you twitch the slack line you get the bait to dance around like a minnow. Drop shotting works for me in any weather condition, but it often outfished other methods during periods where the fish are less active and holding a little deeper. I learned the whole technique up on Lake Geneva from John Trossen. When I go out with him that's usually the method we use the most and it produces fish and big ones. I have caught everything from big bluegill to smallmouth to largemouth and even northern pike with this method. You should be using light line (6 to 8 pound test) with about 18 to 24 inches of line between the hook and the weight. Hope this helps a little bit. It takes a while to get a feel for the technique once you start, but once you get a good handle on it you will catch fish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,835 Posts
I could give you extremely detailed info on drop-shotting and how I applied it and had success with it, but it would be specifically for Sand Bass, and Spotted Sand Bass in San Diego Harbor.

:?

Give me another season to apply everything I've learned, and I would be happy to get back to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
I believe the best time to throw a D-shot, is after a big cold front... when fish dont want to chase anything and are stubborn to bite all together...I will use D-shot around single pieces of cover... or any area...where I get that feeling...you know that sense that tells you, "there has to be a fish there." ....Example the poles/ signs that stick outta the water at Busse...I like to throw past the object I plan on fishing and slowly creep it up next to the strcture... when i get to the money zone ...I will just slowly raise and let fall with out moving the weight...and repeat about four or five times...if there no fish on the end of your line after that ...I reel it and and look for the next money spot.

I am not the best at this by anymeans...still shy away from it most of the time....but this is what has worked for me, and i am intrested to hear others peoples thoughts!

-JayPee
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
DROP shotting is easy! I throw a drop shot probably every other time im out. Honestly, you can fish this anywhere/anytime before or after a cold front like JP was saying, but I've had my best days on a warm summer night. Bounce your weight, usually under a 1/4ounce drop shot weight, i personally use a 1/8ounce weight with about a foot and a half leader. You can fish it with finesse worms, like a 4.5inch robo worm is what I use, wacky rigged. You can also fish it with senko, or even jigs, Cabelas sells drop shot mini jigs. I've caught tons of 2-3lb bass drop shotting in the most pressured forrest perserves, like Mallard and Deep Quarry. Its a new technique many wont throw unless on a boat. Good luck, keep trying, you'll get them .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
Erik,
The guys are right on with their advice. Like Clancy, I concentrate on shaking the line. Make sure you watch the line since some pick-ups are very subtle. My biggest dropshot bass came on a hit I didn't feel but rather saw my line move only a few inches.

I pick up the dropshot in clear water after cold fronts or anytime I anticipate the bass being stubborn. Usually after the plastics and senkos do not produce will I pick up the drop-shot. Many times I'll be alternating between a shakey head and a drop-shot until I pick up a pattern. Weedlines, points, and other deeper water are what I usually focus on but I have used them in shallows too. The lures I have caught fish with on the dropshot are cut-tail worms, 3" senkos, and Chompers finesse worms. You can really go through the senkos fast so I am going to try some 3" Dingers this year since they are a little cheaper.

I usually start with a 3/16 weight but I will change based on depth or wind. A #1 or #2 Owner baitholder hook is what I use. I start my hook about 18" or so above the weight and adjust from there. Make sure your hook is sitting straight up- practice tying at home. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
A lot of good info on here already. I have been dropshotting for 5 years. I always have a drop-shot rigged when I go out. I fish roboworms exclusively. Clancy and Fishkid are spot on with their info. I will dropshot from shore if I can also. This is a money pattern for lethargic mid summer bass. Fishing ledges and dropoffs mid summer during the day will get them with a dropshot rig. I remember Fishkid dropshotted a nice bass at the Busse tourney last year. :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
RonG said:
I believe drop shotting is illegal in MI. Check your regs for where you will be fishing.
Drop-shotting Not OK in Michigan

The technique of Drop-shotting is a new method of catching bass first introduced in the southern states, and it's catching on in the Midwest, too. But it's not legal in Michigan. Their fishing regulations prohibit snagging in Michigan, and the same regulations also makes the drop-shot rig illegal for fishing in Michigan waters.

Most Great Lakes states prohibit snagging, but the drop-shot rig is not illegal. Michigan's fishing regulations booklet states anglers can not "have a weight suspended below any hook unless the hook is on a dropper line of at least 3" long."

The drop-shot rig involves tying a hook onto the main line, putting a soft plastic lure on the hook, and adding a sinker to the end of the line, below the lure. It's effective, and often deadly. The rig is designed to have an angler suspend a lure off the bottom, but Michigan calls it snagging.

This is kind of a dumb reason not to allow dropshotting and having a 3" leader kind of defeats the purpose. I think Michigan's DNR could probably make a distinction between having a 1/8 ounce weight tied well below a hook and swing a 4 ounce treble attached to a broom handle :roll:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thats bizarre that you can't drop shot in MI. Is that only on the great lakes? because I do alot of U.P. michigan fishing on lakes that have nothing to do with the Great lakes. I know they hate people snagging salmon n wahtnot in the great lakes, though I doubt they would give a damn where I fish, considering you never hear of anyone even thinking about snagging and bucketheads/poachers seem non-existent up there, which is why they piss me off so much down here, im not accustomed to poachers on my waters.

Anyhow, great info, I had a feeling this topic would blow up with good insight considering drop-shotting is such a hot topic in today's angling. Again thanks to all for the input, I only put this thing up 2 hrs ago and im already set with some new tips and trix of the trade to boost my confidence when experimenting with this tactic this season. :D

Hopefully Ill be able to have the technique down by mid summer, Though last year I barely threw any slow plastics, or even bass jigs or anything that wasnt quick paced. I really expanded my realm of power fishing with experimenting different cranks, perfecting chatterbait techniques, and other fast water covering methods (which really paid off extremely well, making it by far my best bass year ever and more 3-5 lb bass than ever)

P.S. a tip to all the plastic professionals out there...

I used to have more confidence in senkos, and texas rig plastic worms ect in 07. Now after mastering more power techniques, I barely fish senkos or anything slow at all! Really take the time to examine more KVD style techniques and you can prolly double your catches. that was my biggest lesson of 08'. i thought the senko was the best bait ever, but now it takes a backseat when compared to the higher paced fishing I learned over last seaon.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,234 Posts
Good point on power fishing and KVD. If anyone is interested in reading a great article on him, check out last month In-Fishermen. It goes indepth to how he pre-fishes a tournament as well as the specific gear he uses for different patterns. It is truly a humbling article when you see how smart and focused he is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
FishinMatt said:
Wow, that is some awesome info guys. Paul, I'd be interested in some on the water instruction if you ever need a partner on Delavan during late summer/early fall.
Sounds like a plan Matt. I'm probably not as good as some of these other guys with the dropshot but I did catch some nice fish at Delavan last August on it. It was a lot of fun and really rewarding. Looking forward to it this year.

Erik- What kind of water are you fishing? I know I miss out on the power fishing bite occassionally since I am not a power fishermen but I doubt it is always the most effective way to go. I think there is a reason why most tournament anglers are jig/plastics guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Oh I know that power fishing is not always key, Its about fifty fifty in my book between Power style VS Slow and subtle. The reason I got into it so much last year was because I never really explored it as much as past years and its alot of fun to grow confidence in new baits and fishin styles. I fish alot in northern wisconsin, and michigan U.P. and there is unlimited amounts of good fishable water up there. The power tactics paid off because we could hit more spots and recognize weather fish were there or not quickly. You can cover more territory in less time and nab those aggressive fish, or you don't get many bites and shoot the the next spot or switch to another lake till you find more aggressive fish. Which indefinitely equates to more FISH :D .

My fav thing to do after catching some bass on a spot on a power technique, is to go back after the bite slows on your fast tactic, and then whip out the plastics or pigNjig and get those other inactive bass that didnt want your fast action high spped lure. (a very popular technique used by many successful anglers and well known)

I was just mentioning that if you have not endulged yourself into the fruits of power fishing, you gotta get out there and nail down some new tactics to add to your arsenal alongside your slow tactics.

Theres a ton of guys that focus only on the slow and finesse tactics, but you will find yourself to be a more successful angler if you sharpen both skills, then your set for any situation. Everyone knows that bass will almost always hit a senko, worm or pig and jig, but if there only a handful of hungry fish in a large area you gunna spend alot more time finding em with slow tactic obviously. Use that power weapon you got to Seek and Destroy first! :twisted:
You find em quicker, then you can nail em with your finesse tactic once you know where they are at and what they might be doing. and boom you get many more fish, and ya get to catch em in differnet ways which is always fun to me.

I mispoke, I meant to say that I have more confidence starting with a power tactic, if nothing happens, then I slow it down. So the baits im gunna throw first are gunna be fast, gunna cover area, and tell me if there are active fish. If nothing pans out, then Ill whip out the plastic and pick tose bass to pieces slow and meticulous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
BassMasterErik said:
I have more confidence starting with a power tactic, if nothing happens, then I slow it down. So the baits im gunna throw first are gunna be fast, gunna cover area, and tell me if there are active fish. If nothing pans out, then Ill whip out the plastic and pick tose bass to pieces slow and meticulous.
Couldn't agree more. If I am fishing an area, I start with power baits however if there is a laydown or some other piece of cover, it gets picked apart with by something slow. A lot of times, the cover dictates what I am throwing as I move through an area. I also consider the conditions when I am deciding what to pick up first. Clouds and/or wind means a fast moving bait to me. Plus, if it is real windy it too hard to fish plastics anyways.

Also, there are some times when the bass want a fast moving bait NOT the slow techniques. I was fishing the Calumet River last fall and it was all crankbaits. Plastics and senkos in the same spots did not produce. Had the same thing happen at Lake of Egypt last spring. I guess on those days the bass are keying on a reaction strike. Good fishing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,924 Posts
Drop shotting is absolutely a must on Geneva... What's great about Geneva is you can do it for both smallies and largemouth practically the entire open water season... I learned how to drop shot a couple years ago and I do it just about every time I go... The best part about it is that anything generally will work as far as plastics go...

I use Gamagatsu #2 Octopus Circle Hooks... What is great about these hooks is that they are small but they absolutely never let go... They are impressive... Baits are simple... Geneva for example, would be the natural or watermelon colored 6 inch finesse worm... I fished a tourney with a friend of mine 3 years ago on Geneva and he caught a 6.3 on a 6 inch natural paddletail walleye worm in 18 feet of water... What a fish! Only issue I might have with Geneva, especially when it gets warmer, is that you have to sort through a lot of Rock Bass while searching for the meat eaters...

Most of the lakes I fish in Illinois, I use a junebug colored 6 inch finesse worm... In the spring I have drop shotted flukes with pretty good success too... My big thing is the 1/2 ounce cylindrical weight though... I like to feel everything I touch on the bottom... Another reason I like the heavier sinker, is that from shore, it allows me to cast well past weedlines... 18 inches distance is pretty standard for me too...

I agree to some extent about shaking the bait as you bring it in... It is a very very subtle "shake" though... I mean only shaking the rod tip a few inches during retrieve... A lot of times, I just slowly drag the sinker along the bottom, bouncing off of anything I can run into, until I have the rod pointing at 12 o'clock... This presentation is killer... You will catch big fish if you master it... Fish in my avatar was caught last season on a 6 inch junebug worm on a drop shot... - BPM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Great tips bassprotumak, I will definietely use these ideas this year. And paul S. that thing you mentioned about the crankbaits in the wind. I completely agree, one of the easiest ways to find fish is to hit the absolutle windiest wind blown shoreline and chuck cranks all over it(especially points), this tactic works great for walley smb and lmb, and especially trophy pike in canada. The bait fish slowly get schooled into the windy areas and pushed up against structure and will almost always start a feeding frenzy! Important to fish spots that have been getting nailed by wind for at least a few hours or even days, new wind wont have anything schooled in there just then.

A good tip- when its windy out, fish the windy areas, the calm areas (though more comfortable and easy to fish in) often have the less aggresive non-feeding fish. (unless you are fishing a smal secluded calm bay with wind blowing into the mouth of it, that can be MONEY)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My main fishin bud is a power fisherman almost exclusively, and it will be tough to get down to finesse when he can cast the area around the boat before I can even work a slow tactic back on one cast :roll: . Ill have to tackle this one when im fishin solo :D
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top