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Hi,
My name's copper & tonight I went fishing with my best friend. He was trying a new place for walleye and he caught nothing. While he was losing all of his jigs to underwater structure I barked and growled at a buckethead, chased some ducks, did a little wet wading & caught me a cat.

 

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Haha, Nice report Copper ;).. Did you throw the Captain overboard? LOL j/k great Catch Ringneck! :lol:
 

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ringneck said:
Hi,
My name's copper & tonight I went fishing with my best friend. He was trying a new place for walleye and he caught nothing. While he was losing all of his jigs to underwater structure I barked and growled at a buckethead, chased some ducks, did a little wet wading & caught me a cat.

Use slightly smaller jigs. Faster the water is moving, bigger the jigs. You want them to JUST BARELY touch the rocks on the bottom. Most of the time, it really isn't even necessary. Being down right off the bottom is good too. Heavier jigs will get hung up constantly. Also, try not to cast upstream with jigs. You will lose 2/3 of them doing that. Cast them across the river and downstream and let the river do most of the work while reeling in slowly/twitching. I have lost one jig in 4 outings this way, and caught plenty of walleye. 8)

I should also add that I use jigs that I can bend the hooks on, if I snag up on something bad, without breaking my 4 lb. braid. The longer you can keep that jig in the water, regardless of condition, the better the chance at catching some fish.
 

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Ed1979 said:
ringneck said:
Hi,
My name's copper & tonight I went fishing with my best friend. He was trying a new place for walleye and he caught nothing. While he was losing all of his jigs to underwater structure I barked and growled at a buckethead, chased some ducks, did a little wet wading & caught me a cat.

Use slightly smaller jigs. Faster the water is moving, bigger the jigs. You want them to JUST BARELY touch the rocks on the bottom. Most of the time, it really isn't even necessary. Being down right off the bottom is good too. Heavier jigs will get hung up constantly. Also, try not to cast upstream with jigs. You will lose 2/3 of them doing that. Cast them across the river and downstream and let the river do most of the work while reeling in slowly/twitching. I have lost one jig in 4 outings this way, and caught plenty of walleye. 8)

I should also add that I use jigs that I can bend the hooks on, if I snag up on something bad, without breaking my 4 lb. braid. The longer you can keep that jig in the water, regardless of condition, the better the chance at catching some fish.
Ed, you hit it right on!!! One thing you forgot though, always make sure you sharpen your hook(s) after a snag, those rocks will dull your hook(s) instantly and cause in missed fish. ;)
 

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True. I typically check the hooks after a good snag is pulled out. A lot of times, you snag up on some rotten trees or branches or just other garbage under the water, and not rocks, so the hook point is fine. If I can poke my finger with it, I generally call it sharp enough. lol

Also, if I dull the hook a little on a snag, I just set the hook a LITTLE bit harder when I get a hit, until I can sharpen it, or it is time to retie. Typically, if it is time to retie because the line is a little beat up, I just grab another jig out of my pouch. It's much quicker than sharpening the hook. I've kind of perfected the art of jig fishing the river. I need to work on fishing cranks other than my Rebel Crawdads though... I'm not nearly as aggressive or confident with those, because they're expensive and snag up pretty easily. :lol:
 

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Ed1979 said:
True. I typically check the hooks after a good snag is pulled out. A lot of times, you snag up on some rotten trees or branches or just other garbage under the water, and not rocks, so the hook point is fine. If I can poke my finger with it, I generally call it sharp enough. lol

Also, if I dull the hook a little on a snag, I just set the hook a LITTLE bit harder when I get a hit, until I can sharpen it, or it is time to retie. Typically, if it is time to retie because the line is a little beat up, I just grab another jig out of my pouch. It's much quicker than sharpening the hook. I've kind of perfected the art of jig fishing the river. I need to work on fishing cranks other than my Rebel Crawdads though... I'm not nearly as aggressive or confident with those, because they're expensive and snag up pretty easily. :lol:
You can never set the hook too hard ;)
 

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WrenchingnFishing said:
Ed1979 said:
True. I typically check the hooks after a good snag is pulled out. A lot of times, you snag up on some rotten trees or branches or just other garbage under the water, and not rocks, so the hook point is fine. If I can poke my finger with it, I generally call it sharp enough. lol

Also, if I dull the hook a little on a snag, I just set the hook a LITTLE bit harder when I get a hit, until I can sharpen it, or it is time to retie. Typically, if it is time to retie because the line is a little beat up, I just grab another jig out of my pouch. It's much quicker than sharpening the hook. I've kind of perfected the art of jig fishing the river. I need to work on fishing cranks other than my Rebel Crawdads though... I'm not nearly as aggressive or confident with those, because they're expensive and snag up pretty easily. :lol:
You can never set the hook too hard ;)
Haha, I take it you don't fish for papermouths too often then? :lol:
 

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Ed1979 said:
WrenchingnFishing said:
Ed1979 said:
True. I typically check the hooks after a good snag is pulled out. A lot of times, you snag up on some rotten trees or branches or just other garbage under the water, and not rocks, so the hook point is fine. If I can poke my finger with it, I generally call it sharp enough. lol

Also, if I dull the hook a little on a snag, I just set the hook a LITTLE bit harder when I get a hit, until I can sharpen it, or it is time to retie. Typically, if it is time to retie because the line is a little beat up, I just grab another jig out of my pouch. It's much quicker than sharpening the hook. I've kind of perfected the art of jig fishing the river. I need to work on fishing cranks other than my Rebel Crawdads though... I'm not nearly as aggressive or confident with those, because they're expensive and snag up pretty easily. :lol:
You can never set the hook too hard ;)
Haha, I take it you don't fish for papermouths too often then? :lol:
Only during ice season... but I like to catch big fish! :lol:
 

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WrenchingnFishing said:
Ed1979 said:
WrenchingnFishing said:
Ed1979 said:
True. I typically check the hooks after a good snag is pulled out. A lot of times, you snag up on some rotten trees or branches or just other garbage under the water, and not rocks, so the hook point is fine. If I can poke my finger with it, I generally call it sharp enough. lol

Also, if I dull the hook a little on a snag, I just set the hook a LITTLE bit harder when I get a hit, until I can sharpen it, or it is time to retie. Typically, if it is time to retie because the line is a little beat up, I just grab another jig out of my pouch. It's much quicker than sharpening the hook. I've kind of perfected the art of jig fishing the river. I need to work on fishing cranks other than my Rebel Crawdads though... I'm not nearly as aggressive or confident with those, because they're expensive and snag up pretty easily. :lol:
You can never set the hook too hard ;)
Haha, I take it you don't fish for papermouths too often then? :lol:
Only during ice season... but I like to catch big fish! :lol:
I've caught several crappie that are in that keeper walleye size range. :wink: Granted, it doesn't happen every time I'm out fishing for them, but several times a year for sure. Especially in spring... The females we catch make most of those walleye look pretty small. Fourteen-sixteen inch crappie on ultralight gear is an absolute blast.
 
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