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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
That still leaves a lot of options, how much do you want to spend?

For fishing I would say one person per kayak, tandem kayaks sound like fun but add a 1/2oz lure with a razer sharp hook being swung past your face a few times and you'll reconsider.

I would have to say for the smaller stretches of the DPR I prefer my canoe because I have more room for rods and lures so there is less chance of hitting a overhang and loosing a rod. On the a bigger river like the Fox down by Geneva I love my yak, super stable and easier to paddle even against the current. On small ponds the canoe is nice but even on smaller ponds or bigger lakes when a speed boat blasts by or the wind picks up I would rather be in the yak.

Kayaks can go the distance with less energy and my main reason for fishing from a kayak is my sit on top kayak does not swamp. I would hate to loose a canoe or sit in side kayak to Davy Jones.
 

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http://www.gheenoe.net/

This makes a excellent fishing platform for two anglers. WAY more stable than a canoe, I can stand on the seat and cast all day in wind and waves.

you can easily rig a trolling motor or small engine. I won't ramble on but I was VERY impressed with this boat.

For solitude you can not beat a yak. a tandem yak is like tandem skydiving it's cool but just not the same IMO you just don't experience the freedom.

While canoes hold a special place in my heart it would be my last choice. they really catch the wind and stabilty can be an issue even for experienced paddlers in waves/wakes.

If I come across a good used Gheenoe I'll have a 15' flat back canoe forsale.
 

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Having owned a canoe/kayak shop and having fished out of both, definitely a canoe. It's just easier.

Things don't fall out of them, things don't fall off of them, including you.
I don't care how well built and designed the kayak is, it will always have shortcomings. I don't care how much you pare down your equipment, it will still be too much for a kayak. Everything you're using will get soaking wet, things will fall out no matter how hard you try not to let that happen, you'll lose you're paddle at some point. It will happen.

For a river like the Fox, go wading. Unless you think fishing the pools above dams is fun.
There's a good chance that no matter how good of a kayak/canoe fisherman you are, you're drifting past 90 percent of the fish you could be catching. A boat of any kind will be a nice way to go from one spot to another, but you still have to get out to fish a river effectively. In the mean time, you passed up a lot of good water.

Ponds are a different story, but I would still get a canoe.

I first started using Gheenoe canoes 28 years ago. Like Hoff said, you can stand on the seat and cast. You'll fall out, but it won't flip. When I'd go fishing with my kids, I didn't have to worry. The only drawback is that the lightest one weighs about 125 pounds. They're also not good for rocky rivers. It's only a matter of time before you wear a hole in it.
 

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I have owned a canoe, an Old Town Discovery 169 for many years and I have no intention of getting rid of it. It can haul an amazing amount of equipment with you through the wilderness. However the times that I paddled my canoe alongside fishing kayaks I felt very out-classed by the kayaks. They are more maneuverable than canoes and the new fishing specific versions of the sit-on-top models seem to have angler friendly layouts. I have heard from others that you should plan on getting wet if your dealing with any kind of wave action but in warm weather I'm O.K. with that; in cool or cold weather just wear waders. In the event you are stricken by a case of the dropsies there are paddle leashes and floats as well as floatation devices for everything else including your rods. A kayak is certain to be limiting factor compared to canoe when it comes to the amount of gear you can haul but it's still more than you will carry while wading. I don't have my yak yet (another week or so for delivery) so only time will tell if reality measures up the fantasy for me... I will let you know
 

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Well I pretty much throw the same stuff all the time fishing. So if crappie fishing, everything fits in coffee can, if flyfishing, it fits in the vest. And you aren't in a 23 foot ranger so you got to have a plan. I keep my yak pretty naked no holes drilled.
 

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TaterToT said:
Hmmm. Ken G got some good points. If I am in the river I most likely will wade. This is prolly mostly for outings and lakes and things. Still can't decide 100%
I wouldn't rule out a kayak because you mostly wade the river. At summer levels I use mine mostly as a means of transport from wading spot to wading spot. You can cover alot of water and just paddle the stretches you don't want to fish or know don't hold many fish. Sit on top kayaks are easy to get in and out of too.

On my kayak (Hobie Quest Fisherman) I can have three rods with me, a big bag of gear, a tackle tray right between my legs, and a decent size cooler. Never once lost any gear or my paddle. Most SOT kayaks outfitted for fishing have tons of bungees to strap stuff down.

If you wanted to check out some canoes vs. kayaks on some test paddles it may be worth a trip to this place..http://www.rutabaga.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ken G said:
There's a good chance that no matter how good of a kayak/canoe fisherman you are, you're drifting past 90 percent of the fish you could be catching. A boat of any kind will be a nice way to go from one spot to another, but you still have to get out to fish a river effectively. In the mean time, you passed up a lot of good water.
Good points, I have found sitting side saddle and casting a good way to mix it up and fish water slower or peg it in with the sand spike and wade.



The difference between loosing a paddle in my kayak vs loosing the paddle in the canoe is in the kayak i am prepared to get wet. In the Canoe I don't plan on it. I got out in a wet suit or waders in the kayak (at least until the water warms) in the canoe I don't prepare as much, waders or a wet suit seem like over kill even though there is about the same chance of going in.

The kayak requires more special equipment. I say look for a canoe online in the area (you can find them on Craigslist for $200 easy) and fish it for a season. If after a season you are still debating getting a yak do it and do it the way you want to. After a season of paddling the waterways you fish you will know the answer. Everyone is different and you got to do what is good for you. The canoe is a good step if you want to do it, either way you will catch fish and have a blast getting off the shore and away from bucketheads. Good luck bro.
 
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