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toothdoc said:
No, it is not deep enough nor does it possess the type of environment that smallies live in.
I stocked (with permission) a smallmouth in the small 2 acre private pond in my subdivision. The pond is on average waist deep with a maximum depth of 5.5 ft in the "deep hole." It's muddy, has carp, looks like chocolate milk all summer with a visibility of 1 to 2 inches. To my surprise, I caught the smallmouth again over two years later. For all I know, it's still in there. 8)

Certain bodies of water may not be ideal for reproduction, but you'd be surprised what fish can survive in.
 

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I'm with rootpro - EEEEEEEHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH.

I fish the creek about 100 days a year. Maybe just 10 times a year, I run into a few like this:









Overall, it's a complete waste of time fishing for them. Creek used to have many of them back in the late-1990's but that's due to stockings (again - waste of time and resources). 1996-97, 41,000 fingerlings and some breeder adults were introduced. Since then, I would estimate that 95% of the original batch has died due to unsatisfactory water quality and pollution issues. At this point, I wouldn't even consider retrying it.

Creek has good depth, bottom substrate, and structure here down south which is where they were all stocked. The only problem is in the lack of sustainable water quality.

In comparison the Largemouth fishing is decent but their growth rates are poor. I don't care for Busse and stretch by WWD but they all seem to max out at 15-16 inches no matter where you're at. This stream makes things interesting if you want to catch some fish in the heart of the 'burbs.
 

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I'm sure Drew will comment on this. I've heard that smallies were experimentally stocked in limited numbers years ago and didn't seem to last very long. If you come across one now it is very rare. I don't think the quality of water is there and there are only limited stretches that provide enough structure. On the other hand in many cases the East and West Branch of the duper is fairly narrow and both hold smallies with the West Branch holding alot. I'm going to go with water quality or the lack there of.

** While I was writing this Andrew responded with what I thought he'd say. Anyway here's my original post.
 

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billyk said:
Why would the Dupage have better water quality than the creek? They both run in similar areas and the Dupe does go through some industrial areas. billyk
It has better shoreline vegetation which leads to better natural filtration and purification of the water. Ever notice how and why the water clarity on the DuPage is pretty awesome compared to the other regional rivers?

Lack of severe erosion is a major factor too which leads to far less sedimentation, which is a problem currently being addressed on the creek.

Less street run-off and non-point pollution too. DuPage isn't as urbanized as the Salt Creek.
Less crap plants too.

I can go on and on. There are a lot of significant differences between the two.

Visit both rivers, take some notes, make comparisons, and you will see.
 

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This is interesting. Pretty cool that there some smallies in the creek. The Fox River doesn't exactly look like it has clean water but the smallies seem to be doing ok in there. I'm no expert on the Fox though but to me I always considered it dirty just by looking at it.
 

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I forgot to add.

PH levels add to the problem too. In some parts, the Salt Creek is almost borderline-acidic and devoid of life.
I've got an ichthyologist friend from Ohio (originally Addison IL) who does some electroshocking, netting, and water testing whenever he comes to town.

Addison/Villa Park is the worst stretch out there. It's no secret.
 
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