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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are we calling the OCC pond now? Anyways...went out there yesterday afternoon and fished from about 3:00-5:15 PM. Met Jason out there for the first time as I was getting ready to head out...nice chatting with you Jason!

The wind was pretty brutal, so it was a good lesson in throwing baitcasters into the wind. Caught three bass, two dinks and one that weighed just under 3 pounds. Caught the bigger one on a chartreuse chatterbait and the two dinks on a chartreuse spinnerbait.

All three fish looked terrible. They almost looked bleached they were so white. The fish below had red all around his lips and inside his mouth. I've never seen anything like it. Sure looked unhealthy.

Here's a pic:

 

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Nice goin Billy! I have had a few lmb out of places (most recently lagoons) that looked practically albino. Weird stuff. I really enjoy the site of a colorful lmb, and it freaks me out to see these "variations".
 

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Great to meet you Drew. And thanks for the kind words about the site!

I only was there about 40 minutes as I was in a hurry to get home. Tossed a few different baits but left with out a hit.

Nice job on that bass Drew!
 

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Bass tend to turn white when the water starts to get really cold. Also I believe wounds in its mouth inside and out are from heavy feed on gills / crappies and crawfish. Wouldnt your mouth look like that if you tried to swallow a 6-8 inch gill/crappie with fins and everything. just my 2 cents.

Great job on there BassBilly and thanks for the report. The " Pond" is a Gem. There are some pigs there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Legend075 said:
Bass tend to turn white when the water starts to get really cold. Also I believe wounds in its mouth inside and out are from heavy feed on gills / crappies and crawfish. Wouldnt your mouth look like that if you tried to swallow a 6-8 inch gill/crappie with fins and everything. just my 2 cents.

Great job on there BassBilly and thanks for the report. The " Pond" is a Gem. There are some pigs there.
Yeah I thought the redness might be a result of feeding. I wonder if the whiteness is due to the fact that they get so little oxygen in that pond. There's almost no vegetation at all. You don't see that kind of coloration on fish that are in healthy ponds/lakes with good vegetation.
 

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Bassbilly81 said:
Legend075 said:
Bass tend to turn white when the water starts to get really cold. Also I believe wounds in its mouth inside and out are from heavy feed on gills / crappies and crawfish. Wouldnt your mouth look like that if you tried to swallow a 6-8 inch gill/crappie with fins and everything. just my 2 cents.

Great job on there BassBilly and thanks for the report. The " Pond" is a Gem. There are some pigs there.
Yeah I thought the redness might be a result of feeding. I wonder if the whiteness is due to the fact that they get so little oxygen in that pond. There's almost no vegetation at all. You don't see that kind of coloration on fish that are in healthy ponds/lakes with good vegetation.
Good point it could be a lack of oxygen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Culprit said:
Nice fish :D

The fountains oxygenate that pond .
Interesting point about the fountains..hadn't thought of that. I'm still perplexed at the "whiteness" issue though. I'm not buying the cold water explanation (except that the vegetation dies in natural lakes), mainly because I've actually noticed the opposite in the winter. Largemouth and Smallies tend to actually get darker in the winter time, especially on their backs. This is a natural development that allows for greater warmth. Anybody else have any hypothesis?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I found a scientific answer to the coloration question:

Largemouth bass have photo receptors in their
eyes that help them cue the changes in their pigment cells in their
skin. Their eyes receive the reflected light from their surroundings
and this can trigger a chemical release (hormones) in their skin to
move the pigment closer to the surface of the skin or further away.
This is an adaptation that allows them to camouflage themselves
better when they are hunting prey or being hunted by larger fish. If
they are in clear water with good vegetation/cover they usually will
take on a darker color on their back, green on their sides and white
on their belly. This is when they also have the beautiful green
horizontal bar across their side. When they suspend out in deep water
or even in shallow muddy water they will take on a more
faded/bleached out appearance, it can even be a buttery color. This
is because their only cover is either each other in a school or the
open water. When they are in shallow clear rocky or wood cover with
no vegetation they can also be more black and white. By having a
more uniform color appearance in open or muddy water they are less
noticeable by predators or prey.

So when you catch a fish in shallow clear water and the fish is more
pale in color it did in fact most likely "come up" from deeper water
or from being suspended off shore unless the water is cold and muddy.
Most color changes can happen fairly quickly (less than a day.)
 
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