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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was busy getting cut off by big toothy critters but the smaller toothy critters are doing their thing. Best time is 1 hour before sunset. The bite is extremely time sensitive, can set your watch to when they start and stop! Locating them is easy with basic knowledge. A few 22+ in the past week.
 

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Premium Member
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539 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Slackwater eddies & seams very near/right next to raging water. The fox is disgustingly high right now. I went out there to wade and couldn't get more than a few feet from shore without getting the inside of my waders wet :(

IMO the three best ways to pick them up right now:
A.) large/extra large fathead on a 1/16 jig head(chart or orange) under a bobber, either rigged under a slip float or 2 1/2-3 1/2ft below a pencil bobber. I usually try and drop it at the front of a seam and let the current work it down on the soft side. The trick is to use the current to take it back up stream a little bit every once and a while thus keeping it in the same area longer. If you know the bottom contour float it along at the drop off point.

B.) "Lindy Rig Style" #4-#6 floating jighead(stinger not needed if you know how to let em swim with it for a minute) 18-36 inches behind bottom walking lead weight 1/8th-1/4oz, you probably will need a heavier one than normal with the water as high as it is right now. Again if you know where there is a drop off point(steeper the better) try and stick it right on the edge. If you can it'll leave that floating jighead right in the feeding zone. I will always make another cast to try and get it where I want it rather than letting it sit in an area I don't like.

C.) Crankbait, wally diver by cotton cordell are ideal. smithwick rogue and rattlin rogue are also the one's I have. Rapala has a bunch that are great, I like the suspending ones the best.

Please throw the big females back if you catch one, they are an extremely important part of the ecosystem and greatly affect the dominant genetic strains in the Fox, of which few remain.
 
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